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flfigueroa

Fernando Figueroa Figueroa

Traveler 🛩│Puerto Rico 🌴│NYC 🍕 Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever. Madera Ambassador, PM me for discounts!

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Fernando Figueroa Figueroa (@flfigueroa) Instagram photos and videos

List of Instagram medias taken by Fernando Figueroa Figueroa (@flfigueroa)

Green Island National Park

Green Island itself is a coral cay and it is said it used to be four times it’s actual size. Originally named Dabuukji by the aboriginals, it’s actual name was given by James Cook when he arrived in Australia shortly after 1770. —

Green Island National Park

Welcome to the north! This is Green Island in Cairns, Queensland. People come here to snorkel and dive in the Great Barrier Reef. This is the world’s largest coral reef system with around 2,900 individual reefs and 900 islands. —

Nobbies-Phiilip Island

The Nobbies located in the Summerlands in Phillip Island. There’s a colony of little penguins located right on this spot. Also, what you are looking at in these pictures are the Seal Rocks, where the largest colony of fur seals live in Australia. —

Nobbies-Phiilip Island

The Nobbies located in the Summerlands in Phillip Island. There’s a colony of little penguins located right on this spot. Also, what you are looking at in these pictures are the Seal Rocks, where the largest colony of fur seals live in Australia. —

St Kilda Beach

Then we made it to St. Kilda! From St. Kilda we drove to Phillip Island, where you can see the Penguin Parade although you can also see them little ones at the St. Kilda Pier. More to come on Phillip Island but fun fact about St. Kilda, it shares so many similarities to Coney Island in Brooklyn, NY, and with a reason. It even has an amusement park, one of five Luna Parks built across Australia in the 20th century. —

The Twelve Apostles

Almost at the end of the road! When on the Great Ocean Road, you must stop at The Twelve Apostles. These geological landforms known as “sea stacks” or just “stacks”, are shaped by wave erosion. In the case of these stacks, they are formed from limestone accumulated over time, first forming natural sea arches like those you see in my pics from Hawaii, and eventually collapsing. Seven stacks stand now where eight stood before and although named after the disciples of Jesus Chris, there has never been twelve stacks. If you ever visit this place, be adventurous and go down the Gibson Steps to take a cool picture like this! 😎 Also had an amazing weekend with this girl! 👉🏼 @natashaemmie 💁🏼‍♀️ —

Great Ocean Road

Then we made it to the one and only Great Ocean Road! This is 150mi (240km) of beaches, cities, beaches, koalas and some kangaroos, beaches, waterfalls, etc. Deemed to be the world’s largest war memorial, it was built in honor of those soldiers killed during WWI. We started in Torquay and although didn’t make it all the way out to Warrnambool, we spent close to 16hrs on the road! Even longer than my Road to Hana trip! The must do when in Melbourne! Also, did I mention beaches? 😜 @adrilynnvargas are you ready?! —

Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

This is Part 2 of two of my favorite lanes and some of their street art: the Hosier Lane and the AC/DC Lane. Check out those amazing and ! Lookout for some familiar faces!

Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Then we made it Melbourne! Melbs is know for its entertainment and tourism but one of the highlights are its many and located in the most hidden spots around the city. This is Part 1 of two of my favorite lanes and some of their street art: the Hosier Lane and the AC/DC Lane. —

Sydney Opera House

It is so hard to take a good picture of the Sydney Opera House at ground level! Too big, too close, and too many people! Called “one of the most iconic buildings of the 20th century”, most of what you could say about this incredible piece of work is often overshadowed by the architect’s and Sydney’s government multiple disagreements on how to run the project which ultimately led to cost inefficiencies causing this beauty to cost slightly more than $100M in the 1970s which would be pretty close to $1B today! Nevertheless, it is said the venue can host around 1,500 performances attended by over a million people each year! —

Mrs Macquarie's Chair

Swipe left to see why the wife of Major-General Lachlan Macquarie, Governor of New South Wales, used to come and sit here during the evenings. Stay long enough and you’ll be rewarded. The “chair” it’s actually a bench-like carving into the sandstone made by convicts living i. Sydney during 1810, like much of Sydney’s old gems. —

Harbour Bridge Pylon Lookout

Going 200 steps up the Sydney Harbour Bridge South-East Pylon, you could possibly get if not the best the second best view in all Sydney. Check out the Sydney Opera House in the background and some cool pictures of the bridge itself! The Pylon Lookout was opened to the public in 1934 and it’s museum tells the story of how the bridge was built as well as some really cool ! 😏 The bridge measures 440ft (134m) from the very top all the way down to the water and it is 160ft (48m) wide making it not only the tallest steel arch bridge but it was also the widest long-span bridge until 2012. There are hundreds of awesome facts about the bridge but I will tell you the one I find the most interesting. The bridge was way over engineered, with no need for such a vast amount of steel work since there was not enough traffic going through Sydney at the time. However, due to such amazing work, the bridge has today 8 car lanes, 2 train lines, a walkway and even a bike lane with a 160,000 vehicles crossing every day! I can probably keep going on this post but check out some facts online. Next question, why do you think the bridge is painted gray, or how many people you think died during the construction? 😜 —

St Marys Catholic Church

As Sydney was established as a penal settlement back in the 18th century, and as convicts and settlers arrived, no provisions were made for those who practiced the Roman Catholic religion. It wasn’t until 1820 however, that construction began and the spires in particular were not added until the very beginning of the third millennium (i.e. 2000s). —

St Marys Catholic Church

As Sydney was established as a penal settlement back in the 18th century, and as convicts and settlers arrived, no provisions were made for those who practiced the Roman Catholic religion. It wasn’t until 1820 however, that construction began and the spires in particular were not added until the very beginning of the third millennium (i.e. 2000s). — @handstandnation

St Marys Catholic Church

As Sydney was established as a penal settlement back in the 18th century, and as convicts and settlers arrived, no provisions were made for those who practiced the Roman Catholic religion. It wasn’t until 1820 however, that construction began and the spires in particular were not added until the very beginning of the third millennium (i.e. 2000s). —

Sydney, Australia

Check out the Sydney Tower in the background! This is the tallest structure in the city standing at slightly more than a 1,000ft (300m). It’s also known as the Sydney Tower Eye and it is located in Sydney’s Central Business District (CBD). —

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