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is for real! Historically, the shoreline of Saint Lawrence Island is sheathed in sea ice that forms throughout the winter and melts in the summer, but the sea ice never formed completely in the winter and spring of 2018-2019, due to the warming climate. ▫️ This has created new challenges for the Yup’ik people, for whom subsistence hunting is a primary source of food and identity. The Yup'ik have been hunting and fishing the Bering Sea for thousands of years, with walrus being a staple of their diet. The walrus herds were decimated by whalers in the 1800s, but have since rebounded, only now they are newly threatened by the retreating sea ice, and the hunting season for walrus has grown shorter as well. ▫️ Photographer @kiliiiyuyan traveled to Saint Lawrence Island last spring to work with indigenous youth on an art therapy project to address in their community. Follow the link in our bio to read more about his work in this remote community. ▫️ Photo: @kiliiiyuyan #masksofgriefandjoy Reposted from @pacificstand

☕🔬❇🔆🐰🌐🦋⚔👊📗 (@fmental.bien) Instagram Profile Photo
fmental.bien

☕🔬❇🔆🐰🌐🦋⚔👊📗

@leonardodicaprio⚪:   @pacificstand: Historically, the shoreline of Saint Lawrence Island is sheathed in sea ice that forms throughout the winter and melts in the summer, but the sea ice never formed completely in the winter and spring of 2018-2019, due to the warming climate. ▫️ This has created new challenges for the Yup’ik people, for whom subsistence hunting is a primary source of food and identity. The Yup'ik have been hunting and fishing the Bering Sea for thousands of years, with walrus being a staple of their diet. The walrus herds were decimated by whalers in the 1800s, but have since rebounded, only now they are newly threatened by the retreating sea ice, and the hunting season for walrus has grown shorter as well. ▫️ Photographer @kiliiiyuyan traveled to Saint Lawrence Island last spring to work with indigenous youth on an art therapy project to address in their community. Follow the link in our bio to read more about his work in this remote community. ▫️ Photo: @kiliiiyuyan   #masksofgriefandjoy

Our Children's Trust (@youthvgov) Instagram Profile Photo
youthvgov

Our Children's Trust

@pacificstand ・・・ Historically, the shoreline of Saint Lawrence Island is sheathed in sea ice that forms throughout the winter and melts in the summer, but the sea ice never formed completely in the winter and spring of 2018-2019, due to the warming climate. ▫️ This has created new challenges for the Yup’ik people, for whom subsistence hunting is a primary source of food and identity. The Yup'ik have been hunting and fishing the Bering Sea for thousands of years, with walrus being a staple of their diet. The walrus herds were decimated by whalers in the 1800s, but have since rebounded, only now they are newly threatened by the retreating sea ice, and the hunting season for walrus has grown shorter as well. ▫️ Photographer @kiliiiyuyan traveled to Saint Lawrence Island last spring to work with indigenous youth on an art therapy project to address in their community. Follow the link in our bio to read more about his work in this remote community. ▫️ Photo: @kiliiiyuyan #masksofgriefandjoy

Hosted by Patrick (@thedailyember) Instagram Profile Photo
thedailyember

Hosted by Patrick

with @Repostlyapp @pacificstand Historically, the shoreline of Saint Lawrence Island is sheathed in sea ice that forms throughout the winter and melts in the summer, but the sea ice never formed completely in the winter and spring of 2018-2019, due to the warming climate. ▫️ This has created new challenges for the Yup’ik people, for whom subsistence hunting is a primary source of food and identity. The Yup'ik have been hunting and fishing the Bering Sea for thousands of years, with walrus being a staple of their diet. The walrus herds were decimated by whalers in the 1800s, but have since rebounded, only now they are newly threatened by the retreating sea ice, and the hunting season for walrus has grown shorter as well. ▫️ Photographer @kiliiiyuyan traveled to Saint Lawrence Island last spring to work with indigenous youth on an art therapy project to address in their community. Follow the link in our bio to read more about his work in this remote community. ▫️ Photo: @kiliiiyuyan #masksofgriefandjoy

Shane Palmer (@mp51993) Instagram Profile Photo
mp51993

Shane Palmer

@pacificstand: Historically, the shoreline of Saint Lawrence Island is sheathed in sea ice that forms throughout the winter and melts in the summer, but the sea ice never formed completely in the winter and spring of 2018-2019, due to the warming climate. ▫️ This has created new challenges for the Yup’ik people, for whom subsistence hunting is a primary source of food and identity. The Yup'ik have been hunting and fishing the Bering Sea for thousands of years, with walrus being a staple of their diet. The walrus herds were decimated by whalers in the 1800s, but have since rebounded, only now they are newly threatened by the retreating sea ice, and the hunting season for walrus has grown shorter as well. ▫️ Photographer @kiliiiyuyan traveled to Saint Lawrence Island last spring to work with indigenous youth on an art therapy project to address in their community. Follow the link in our bio to read more about his work in this remote community. ▫️ Photo: @kiliiiyuyan #masksofgriefandjoy

Leonardo DiCaprio (@leonardodicaprio) Instagram Profile Photo
leonardodicaprio

Leonardo DiCaprio

@pacificstand: Historically, the shoreline of Saint Lawrence Island is sheathed in sea ice that forms throughout the winter and melts in the summer, but the sea ice never formed completely in the winter and spring of 2018-2019, due to the warming climate. ▫️ This has created new challenges for the Yup’ik people, for whom subsistence hunting is a primary source of food and identity. The Yup'ik have been hunting and fishing the Bering Sea for thousands of years, with walrus being a staple of their diet. The walrus herds were decimated by whalers in the 1800s, but have since rebounded, only now they are newly threatened by the retreating sea ice, and the hunting season for walrus has grown shorter as well. ▫️ Photographer @kiliiiyuyan traveled to Saint Lawrence Island last spring to work with indigenous youth on an art therapy project to address in their community. Follow the link in our bio to read more about his work in this remote community. ▫️ Photo: @kiliiiyuyan #masksofgriefandjoy

Pacific Standard (@pacificstand) Instagram Profile Photo
pacificstand

Pacific Standard

Gambell, Alaska

Historically, the shoreline of Saint Lawrence Island is sheathed in sea ice that forms throughout the winter and melts in the summer, but the sea ice never formed completely in the winter and spring of 2018-2019, due to the warming climate. ▫️ This has created new challenges for the Yup’ik people, for whom subsistence hunting is a primary source of food and identity. The Yup'ik have been hunting and fishing the Bering Sea for thousands of years, with walrus being a staple of their diet. The walrus herds were decimated by whalers in the 1800s, but have since rebounded, only now they are newly threatened by the retreating sea ice, and the hunting season for walrus has grown shorter as well. ▫️ Photographer @kiliiiyuyan traveled to Saint Lawrence Island last spring to work with indigenous youth on an art therapy project to address in their community. Follow the link in our bio to read more about his work in this remote community. ▫️ Photo: @kiliiiyuyan #masksofgriefandjoy

Pacific Standard (@pacificstand) Instagram Profile Photo
pacificstand

Pacific Standard

Gambell, Alaska

The Alaskan village of Gambell on Saint Lawrence Island still suffers from the residual effects of colonialism. When American whalers arrived in the region in the mid-1800s, they brought deadly diseases to the region and hunted marine mammals that the indigenous Yup’ik community subsisted on to near extinction. ▫️ The Yup’ik population was decimated. When their community began to rebound, the children were forced by the U.S. government into boarding schools, where any use of their native languages and cultural practices was severely . An entire generation was subjected to physical and abuse and cultural genocide. ▫️ Today the Yup’ik on Saint Lawrence Island face new obstacles: a continued reliance on the market economy, as seasonal hunting is interrupted by a warming climate, cancer from pesticides making their way up the food chain, and ongoing issues with drug and alcohol abuse. In 2012, the annual death rate for Alaska Native youth was 18 times higher than that of American youth overall. ▫️ Photographer @kiliiiyuyan visited Gambell last year to work with high school students on an art therapy project aimed at prevention in this community of around 700 people. Read about his journey and view his photos at the link in our bio. ▫️ Photo: @kiliiiyuyan prevention #masksofgriefandjoy

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