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Washington, District of Columbia

The four freshmen Congresswomen who President attacked on Twitter issued a scathing joint rebuke on July 15, calling his racist remarks “hateful" and “a distraction.” @repocasiocortez, @repilhan, @reprashida and @repayannapressley—all of whom are women of color, and all of whom are U.S. citizens—delivered their response Monday evening on Capitol Hill, right before they headed to the floor for votes. “This is a president who has openly violated the very values our country aspires to uphold. This is the agenda of white nationalists,” Omar said. “When he said 'go back' to where you came from, there was an uproar through all of our communities because every single person who’s brown or black at some point in their life in this country heard that,” she added. “When he made the comment I know that every single Muslim who has lived in this country and across the world has heard that comment.” Read more about the response to Trump's tweets at the link in bio. Video sources: AP, CNN

Jerusalem

After ’s economy, the Islamic Republic of Iran may be Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s favorite topic. There are many reasons Tehran is the major preoccupation of the Middle East, including its destabilizing role in postwar Iraq, the sectarian tensions that flowed from the Arab Spring uprisings and the mullahs’ appetite for nuclear arms. Asked by Senior White House Correspondent @bybrianbennett about what kind of action he would be willing to take if starts stockpiling nuclear material beyond the JCPOA and other agreements, Netanyahu replied: "We’ll take whatever action is necessary to prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons." Watch more of the June 25 interview at the link in bio. Video by @francescatrianni and Adi Mozes (@barzagosta) for TIME

New York, New York

A massive power outage hit on July 13, on the anniversary of the 1977 blackout that affected much of the city. Con Edison attributed the failure to a substation around 6:45 p.m., @apnews reports, but the exact cause wasn't yet known until an investigation is finished. Electricity was restored by about midnight. The blackout affected the whole subway system, with four major Manhattan stations closed, including Columbus Circle and Rockefeller Center. In these photographs: is seen with lights out, and much of 's Midtown West and Upper West Side neighborhoods are seen from above without power. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by David Dee Delgado (@dee_bx) and @scottheins@gettyimages

Paris, France

Within the interior of the fire-ravaged Notre-Dame cathedral in , remote-controlled earth-moving vehicles have ventured into the center of the nave, where the spire fell during the April blaze, to pick out pieces one by one from a large pile of charred debris. But it will take weeks more before the pile is removed. Each piece—including burned bits of the spire and roof, as well as busts and stonework—is being tagged and catalogued under a tent in the front yard of , Vivienne Walt reports. The rows of rescued pieces are separated by stonework and charred wood, including the spire, one of the most iconic landmarks of . “We know the spire is there but we will not try to find it,” chief architect Philippe Villeneuve says. “It is completely shattered.” Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photograph by Patrick Zachmann (@pzachmann)—@magnumphotos for TIME

Paris, France

The man responsible for overseeing the reconstruction of Notre-Dame, chief architect Philippe Villeneuve, tells TIME’s Vivienne Walt the risks of a catastrophic collapse are small, but that the true extent of the damage at the cathedral in will not be known until at least the end of the year. Until then, it will remain a triage site. Those assessing Notre-Dame’s damage are working to a tight deadline: President @emmanuelmacron has declared that the building should be rebuilt within five years. But Villeneuve says there remain some deeply worrying unknowns about what state is in. Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photograph by Patrick Zachmann (@pzachmann)—@magnumphotos for TIME

Paris, France

Nearly three months after a fire gutted Notre-Dame Cathedral in , the building’s chief architect warns there is still a risk that its ceiling arches might yet collapse, causing severe structural damage. “The risk is that all the vaults up there fall,” Philippe Villeneuve tells correspondent Vivienne Walt. "It is that simple." Villeneuve recently took TIME to the rooftop where the fire began in April 15, the first journalists to visit the spot. Some sections of have since been exposed to rainfall and high temperatures that has experienced. Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photograph by Patrick Zachmann (@pzachmann)—@magnumphotos for TIME

Washington, District of Columbia

President Trump listens to Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta, who announced his resignation, at the White House on July 12. Acosta is leaving the administration amid criticism of a secret plea deal he negotiated a decade ago with Jeffrey Epstein, the financier recently indicted on trafficking and conspiracy charges. Two days earlier, a woman not included in the indictments said Epstein her when she was 15. Acosta, whose actions on the case was detailed in a @miamiherald investigation last year and who defended those actions this week, said Friday that he called the president this morning and "told him that I thought the right thing was to step aside." has now had more turnover in his Cabinet in the first two and a half years of his presidency than any of his five immediate predecessors did in their entire first terms. Read the latest on the Epstein case at the link in bio. Photograph by @bsmialowski@afpphoto/@gettyimages

Jerusalem

On the day TIME spent with Benjamin Netanyahu, one of the Israeli Prime Minster’s stops was to cut the ribbon on a history exhibit about the Israeli military. The exhibit dwelled on the country’s David vs. Goliath past, including a 1976 commando raid to rescue more than 100 hostages from a hijacked plane at Entebbe Airport in Uganda, partly led by Netanyahu’s older brother “Yoni,” the only Israeli commando killed in the operation. “It changed my life completely, and it directed it to its current course because Yoni died in the battle against terrorism,” says. But it is history. Forty-three years later, Israel is the regional Goliath. The U.S. gives Israel more military aid than any other country, with a promise, mandated by U.S. legislation, that it will be assured a “qualitative military edge” over any other country in the Middle East. Netanyahu celebrates that advantage at every turn in his busy day, writes @bybrianbennett, our Senior White House Correspondent. Read this week’s full cover story at the link in bio. Photograph by @yuri.kozyrev@noorimages for TIME

Jerusalem

Benjamin Netanyahu in his office, with portraits of Israel’s early Prime Ministers, starting with David Ben-Gurion, top left. Ben-Gurion’s had a utopian quality, writes @bybrianbennett, our Senior White House Correspondent. It built communes (the kibbutz), a socialist economy and a “new Jew”—strapping, self-reliant, nobody’s victim. Ben-Gurion was an atheist. His party, eventually known as Labor, dominated the first three decades of Israel as Netanyahu’s right-wing Likud has largely dominated the next four. Read this week’s full cover story at the link in bio. Photograph by @yuri.kozyrev@noorimages for TIME

In mid-July, Israel’s Benjamin Netanyahu will surpass David Ben-Gurion, the closest thing has to a founding father, to become the longest-serving Prime Minister in the country’s . Bibi, as he is universally known here, has won five elections and cultivated a U.S. President who appears intent on fulfilling @b.netanyahu’s every desire. So why isn’t he in a better mood? The unpleasant reality, writes @bybrianbennett, our Senior White House Correspondent, is that approaches the career summit with his personal power arguably at its greatest risk. Prosecutors have threatened indictments on corruption charges. And he has failed to form a government following his most recent election victory, in April. Instead of spending the summer handing out ministries to allies, Bibi is preparing for yet another campaign, a September do-over election that will test yet again whether the Israel that has grown to resemble its Prime Minister—prosperous, powerful and resilient, yet insecure—still wants him. Read this week’s full cover story at the link in bio. Photograph by @alexmajoliphoto@magnumphotos for TIME

New York, New York

Megan Rapinoe (@mrapinoe) won both the Golden Ball award as the ’s best player and the Golden Boot as its leading scorer. During the @uswnt's whirlwind tour of media appearances and a parade in following the #⚽️ victory in France, she chatted with TIME's @sgregory31 about patriotism, staring down pressure and coping with presidential criticism. Asked about her reaction to Trump's tweeting, during the tournament, that she disrespected the country, Rapinoe replied: "Look, I don’t follow the president on Twitter so I had to search to find it. I know it’s serious, I know it’s a big deal. But it seemed insane to me that this was happening. You skipped over 4,000 things on your to-do list to do this instead. Whatever. We have games to play." Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by Seth Wenig and @rutlman@apnews, Carl Glassman—@polarisimages

Philippines

Relatives and friends attend the funeral of Kateleen Myca Ulpina in Rodriguez, , on July 9. The three-year-old was fatally shot by police officers during a drug raid that targeted her father, who authorities said was armed and may have used her as a human shield. The girl is one of the latest victims of President Rodrigo Duterte's "war on drugs," which groups and and estimate have left more than 6,000—and perhaps as many as 27,000—people dead since 2016. This week, @amnesty described Duterte’s drug war as a "large-scale murdering enterprise" and urged the @unitednations to investigate for crimes against humanity. Photographs by @ezra_acayan@gettyimages

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